LIBR 280-12
History of Books and Libraries
Spring 2012 Greensheet

Elizabeth (Beth) Wrenn-Estes
E-mail
Cell Phone: 510-410-1959
Office location: Home
Office Hours: By Appointment


Greensheet Links
Textbooks and Readings
Course Requirements
Points Allocation and Due Dates
Weekly Outlines
Collaborate Sessions
Discussion Threads
Detailed Assignment Descriptions
Resources
D2L Login and Tutorials
iSchool eBookstore
 

THE BLACKBOARD COLLABORATE SITE AND COURSE GREENSHEET/SYLLABUS
This course will be available on BLACKBOARD COLLABORATE by JANUARY 25, 2012. You will be automatically enrolled into the site. I will send more information about course access as we approach the first day of class.

The instructor expects each student to check into the BLACKBOARD COLLABORATE course site at least once, if not twice, per day to see course updates, resources, announcements, and other relevant information. Students are responsible to know the content on the BLACKBOARD COLLABORATE course site and Greensheet/Syllabus. It is also the student’s responsibility to ask questions and express concerns quickly so that the instructor can provide an answer/response immediately.

Course Description

The purpose of this class is to lead students to a greater awareness of the roles of (1) the book and (2) the library in expressing and fostering culture throughout history.

The "book" is taken to mean all forms of records, e.g., cuneiform fragments, manuscripts, printed books, periodicals, and newspapers.

Expressing culture refers in this context primarily to the appearance of books; the arts of writing, lettering and illustration involved in the production of manuscripts; and the technical developments of papermaking and of printing, engraving, and lithography involved in creating books.

Fostering culture refers to the content of books, the preservation of sacred and secular knowledge through carefully supervised copying of ancient text during the manuscript period, and dissemination of contemporary as well as traditional ideas through the ability to multiply copies by printing.

The development of libraries has naturally followed the historical course of the book, first as conservators of relatively rare and precious repositories of knowledge and imagination for the few who could afford and read books; later as retreats for scholars under the patronage of wealthy and cultured rulers; and finally as information resources for a large and literate public.  Buildings, facilities, organization, and staffing have accommodated themselves to this development, and the changing forms of the book itself - tablet, scroll, folio, codex, octavo, fiche, or data bank.

Course Prerequisites: LIBR 200 required.

Course Objectives

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will become aware of the evolution of graphic communication
    symbols, and be able to identify alphabetic and ideographic systems in
    use in various parts of the world;
  2. Students will become familiar with the material and methods of book
    production in various parts of the world from the manuscript era to the
    present;
  3. Students will be able to analyze aspects of external forces—social, economic, political, religious, and artistic—that have affected the content and
    appearance of books in several specific parts of the world;
  4. Students will understand the economic problems that have shaped
    methods of publishing and distributing books;
  5. Students will be able to attribute major technical and artistic
    developments in typography, book design, and book production
    to persons and nations originating these developments;
  6. Students will understand the institutional development of libraries
    and how libraries have evolved in response to economic, social, and technological change;
  7. Students will be able to analyze the social functions of the library and understand how, why, and when library service evolved from a
    collection-centered to a client-centered institution;
  8. Students will appreciate the development of librarianship as a
    profession and be able to identify seminal theorists and practitioners
    in the field.

LIBR 280 supports the following MLIS Core Competencies:

  • C. recognize the social, cultural and economic dimensions of information use;
  • F. use the basic concepts and principles related to the creation, evaluation,   selection, acquisition, preservation and organization of specific items or collections of information;
  • O. contribute to the cultural, economic, educational, and social well being of our communities.

Course Requirements

DISCLAIMER
The instructor makes every effort to proofread the Greensheet/Syllabus and the BLACKBOARD COLLABORATE Course Site but errors can occur. Please contact the instructor with any errors you see or any questions or may have.

Instructor’s Instructional Philosophy
The instructor wants each student in the course to succeed and will do everything to help students do so but it is a partnership. Please make sure that communication stays a top priority during the semester. Ask questions when you have them, seek clarifications when you need them, take responsibility for understanding all expectations, content and assignments for the course.

The Importance of SOTES
Students evaluate the course and instructor at the end of each term.  This evaluation is known as the SOTES. An announcement will go out from the administration letting students/faculty know when the SOTES are available to complete. Those completing the SOTES, and informing me of doing so, will receive 1 point towards their overall grade. 1 point can make the difference between a higher and a lower grade overall. The importance of SOTES is very easy to describe – it is the student voice to the administration and the instructor giving feedback on the positives and negatives of the student’s experience in the class. Completing the SOTES is so very important to improving courses and instruction.

Questions, Comments, Concerns- Discussion Thread
Please post all questions, concerns, and general comments on the discussion thread under Content/Discussion Threads on the BLACKBOARD COLLABORATE class site. If the question or concern is of a personal nature send directly to the instructor’s email address (bwestes@me.com). 

Lectures
All lectures are posted with each Weekly Outline on the BLACKBOARD COLLABORATE site. Lectures may have been recorded during an earlier semester but are still relevant for the present semester.

E-mail Subject Lines/Naming of Assignment Files - Mandatory

  • Format for subject line for all email correspondence:
    • LIBR 280_12_YOUR LAST NAME
  • Format the file name for all of your assignments:
    • LIBR 280_12_YOUR LAST NAME_KEYWORD OF ASSIGNMENT TITLE

E-mail Response Time
Instructor answers email on a regular basis throughout the day and evenings.

(Policy-Instructor will respond to student emails within 24-hours of receipt). The instructor will inform the class if a longer response time is needed (instructor out of town, illness, etc.)

Students are expected to promptly answer emails from the instructor and fellow students.

BLACKBOARD IM
You must sign up for this free, IM service from the University. SLIS will send out information on how to obtain the software. An excellent way for the class to stay in touch with one another and with the Instructor.

Crisis or Emergency
Please call the instructor if a situation will prevent you from doing assignments or other class activities. You will receive a zero for any course work missed unless you have received permission from the instructor for an extension. The instructor reserves the right to deduct points (the number of points is determined by the instructor) for any work not submitted on time or lack of participation in Blackboard Collaborate session, group work or discussion threads.

Instructor’s cell phone number is 510-410-1959 (pacific time zone).

Course Calendar
Subject to change with fair notice.

Technology Requirements
You will need a high-speed connection (DSL, cable, etc.) to successfully participate in this class. Please see the Technology Requirements and Instructions for Success handout.

GRADING
Rounding – The instructor does not round points to the next whole number. If you receive an 89.6 you will get the grade equivalent for those points.

Grading scale is at end of Greensheet/Syllabus). 
In principal, each student begins the class with a grade of "B", the standard grade for graduate level work. Students who complete the assignments and participate in all discussions will receive the B provided the quality of written work meets the standard of rigorous scholarly work for the University. Above standard work is defined clearly. The breakdown for your course grade, based on the SJSU SLIS Grading Scale, is as meeting the following criteria:

  • Originality in the approach to the assignment.
  • Greater depth of analysis than the written assignment expects
  • Critical evaluate readings by comparing them to other authors or sources.
  • Ability to organize information for themselves and others plus creates tools for life-long learning and knowledge retrieval.

Grading Rubric/Individual Assignment Evaluation Forms
The rubric for written assignments and the instructor’s evaluation forms are located on the Contents page on the BLACKBOARD COLLABORATE course site.

BLACKBOARD COLLABORATE SESSIONS

NOTE: Instructor will post a spreadsheet on GoogleDocs for students to sign up for presentation night(s). The spots will be on a first-come, first-serve basis. You must sign up for a presentation night by the following deadline(s): February 1st - Manuscript Overview and February 15th Book Study Overview. Students who do not sign up will be assigned a night by the Instructor.

BLACKBOARD COLLABORATE SESSIONS – Mandatory

  • #1A (1/2 Class) – Thursday, March 15th  (7 points)
    Individual Presentations – Manuscript Study Overview
    6:30 – 9:00 p.m. Pacific
    Session is Mandatory for those assigned.
  • #1B (1/2 Class) – Thursday, March 22nd (7 points)
    Individual Presentations – Manuscript Study Overview
    6:30 – 9:00 p.m. Pacific
    Session is Mandatory for those assigned.
  • #2A (1/2 Class) – Thursday, April 26th (7 points)
    Individual Presentations – Book Study Overview 

    6:30 – 9:00 p.m. Pacific
    Session is Mandatory for those assigned.
  • #2B (1/2 Class) – Thursday, May 3rd (7 points)
    Individual Presentations - Book Study Overview 

    6:30 – 9:00 p.m. Pacific
    Session is Mandatory for those assigned.

POINTS ALLOCATION AND DUE DATES

Assignment Points Due Date
Manuscript Study 20 March 25 (Wk 9)
Book Study 20 April 25 (Wk 14)
Research Project 30 May 14 (Wk 16)
Discussion Threads (5 Total):
1 at 1 pt., 1 @ 2 pts. and 3 @ 4 pts.
15 See schedule
Blackboard Collaborate- Introduction to Class

Students will listen on their own to archived recording
0 By February 1st
Blackboard Collaborate Session

Individual Presentations – Manuscript
7 1/2 Class - March 15

1/2 Class - March 22
Blackboard Collaborate Session

Individual Presentations - Book Study
7 /2 Class - April 26

1/2 Class - May 3
SOTES Completion 1 End of Semester
Total 100  

NOTE: The Instructor reserves the right to deduct points for any work not done on time, missed Blackboard Collaborate sessions or non-participation in discussion threads.

WEEKLY OUTLINES

It is critical that you follow the weekly outlines under Content on the BLACKBOARD COLLABORATE sites. The Weekly Outlines will walk you through other activities and resources you need to look at, complete, etc. It is critical to use the BLACKBOARD COLLABORATE course site and the Greensheet in conjunction with each other.

Weeks 1-4 (1/25 to 2/19)

  • Topics:
    Origins and Communication in the Ancient World, Book History
  • Readings
    Book History Reader, Introduction and Part 1
Understanding
    Illuminated Manuscripts – read to complete by Week 6
    Scribes, Scripts and Books, Chapters 1-6
  • The Alphabet Versus The Goddess – Chapter 6 (PDF)

Weeks 5-7 (2/20 to 3/11)

  • Topics:
    Manufacture of Books in the Middle Ages, Technological Developments to the 15 Century, Impact of Print
  • Readings
    Book History Reader, Part 2
    Understanding Illuminated Manuscripts – read to complete by Week 6
    Scribes, Scripts and Books, Chapters 7-11
  • Websites to review:
    http://www.medieval-life.net/masterpieces.htm
    http://www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/history/middleages/contents.html
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scriptorium
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incunabula

    Additional websites may be added for this section of the class at a later date and announced to the class via email and the Blackboard Collaborate course site.

Weeks 
8-11 (3/12 to 4/8)

Weeks
 12-14 (4/9 to 4/29)

  • Topics:
    Changes in Book design, Print Culture in the New World, Public Library Movement in the 19th Century America, Special Populations and Special Causes in Early Public Libraries
  • Readings
    Harris/History of Libraries in the Western World – Part 3/12 (PDF)
    Comics, Comix & Graphic Novels/A History of Comic Art – Introduction,        Chapter 1, 2 and 7 (PDF)
  • Websites to review:
    http://www.cambridge.org/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9780521819084
    Additional websites may be added for this section of the class at a later date and announced to the class via email and the Blackboard Collaborate course site.

Weeks 15-16 (4/30 to 5/15 – last day of semester is the 15th)

The Story of the Digital Book http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BaynetLibraries/~3/K4m2PGCEnHA/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email

Additional websites may be added for this section of the class at a later date and announced via email and the Blackboard Collaborate course site.

DISCUSSION THREADS - Mandatory
Three posts per discussion thread are required. The first and second posts must address the topic of the thread and include your insights and opinions on the topic and references to your readings and our discussions. You need to create a short bib indicating what resources you are using in your post if you cite a resource. The two substantial post must be on the thread by midnight Thursday of the week assigned. The Instructor suggests that you post one substantial post by Tuesday midnight and one Thursday midnight. The third post must be a response to one of you classmates and this post must be on the thread by the midnight on Saturday of the week assigned.  The discussion thread closes officially on Sunday at 5 pm for those of you who want to make additional posts beyond the required number. 

Discussion threads are designed to simulate face-to-face/in-class discussion sessions and are held to the same standards as your written assignments including attention to grammar and spelling. The threads are student directed and student driven. The instructor will facilitate conversations but the ultimate goal is for a robust student drive conversation about the topic to occur during the designated time span.

The more posts the better the discussion – post as many times as you want throughout the week.

Optional Student “Open” Discussion Thread
There is an open discussion thread to communicate with each other on an informal basis. Share your insights and comments about your reading. What interests you about the History of the Book, topics like this. Share – create community – enjoy!

Competencies: 1,2/Objectives: A, C

Week 1 (1/25 - 1/29) 1 pt.
(1 post only by Sunday 1/29 midnight)

Introduction - Please let the class know where you work, where you are timeline wise in the program and any other details that you'd like to share with us. In the past students have shared professional information as well as information about family and pets.

Week 3 (2/6 - 2/12) 4 pts.
In Chapter 2 of The Book History Reader Robert Darnton offers some interesting insights in what the history of books is all about. Give an overview of what you thought of his interpretations and research and what gut reactions you have to the chapter.

Posting Requirements: Three posts per discussion thread are required. The first and second posts must address the topic of the thread and include your insights and opinions on the topic and references to your readings and our discussions. You need to create a short bib indicating what resources you are using in your post if you cite a resource. The two substantial post must be on the thread by midnight Thursday of the week assigned. The Instructor suggests that you post one substantial post by Tuesday midnight and one Thursday midnight. The third post must be a response to one of you classmates and this post must be on the thread by the midnight on Saturday of the week assigned.  The discussion thread closes officially on Sunday at 5 pm for those of you who want to make additional posts beyond the required number.

Week 7 (3/5 - 3/11) 4 pts.
Chapter 13 of The Book History Reader Roger Chartier asks the question “Can the extent to which the written word penetrated Western societies in the early modern period be measured? What is your opinion? What else did you glean from your reading of this chapter and Chartier’s opinion.

Posting Requirements: Three posts per discussion thread are required. The first and second posts must address the topic of the thread and include your insights and opinions on the topic and references to your readings and our discussions. You need to create a short bib indicating what resources you are using in your post if you cite a resource. The two substantial post must be on the thread by midnight Thursday of the week assigned. The Instructor suggests that you post one substantial post by Tuesday midnight and one Thursday midnight. The third post must be a response to one of you classmates and this post must be on the thread by the midnight on Saturday of the week assigned.  The discussion thread closes officially on Sunday at 5 pm for those of you who want to make additional posts beyond the required number.

Week 9 (3/19 - 3/25) 4 pts.
Project into the future and describe how you feel the history of the book will be changed or not changed by the new formats and technology entering the world of books and the written word.

Posting Requirements: Three posts per discussion thread are required. The first and second posts must address the topic of the thread and include your insights and opinions on the topic and references to your readings and our discussions. You need to create a short bib indicating what resources you are using in your post if you cite a resource. The two substantial post must be on the thread by midnight Thursday of the week assigned. The Instructor suggests that you post one substantial post by Tuesday midnight and one Thursday midnight. The third post must be a response to one of you classmates and this post must be on the thread by the midnight on Saturday of the week assigned.  The discussion thread closes officially on Sunday at 5 pm for those of you who want to make additional posts beyond the required number.

Week 15 (4/30 – 5/6) 2 pts.
Reflection – Reflect back on the semester and relate to your classmates what you have learned about the History of the Book and what information will be valuable to you as you move forward into your library career.

Post Requirements: Three posts per discussion thread are required. The first and second posts must address the topic of the thread and include your insights and opinions on the topic and references to your readings and our discussions. You need to create a short bib indicating what resources you are using in your post if you cite a resource. The two substantial post must be on the thread by midnight Thursday of the week assigned. The Instructor suggests that you post one substantial post by Tuesday midnight and one Thursday midnight. The third post must be a response to one of you classmates and this post must be on the thread by the midnight on Saturday of the week assigned.  The discussion thread closes officially on Sunday at 5 pm for those of you who want to make additional posts beyond the required number.

Core Competencies: C, F                                   Learning Outcomes: 3,5,7,8

ASSIGNMENTS - 
DETAILED DESCRIPTIONS

MANUSCRIPT STUDY – 20 Points
PART 1 – Research/Blog
DUE March 25th by midnight PST – to drop box

 Select a manuscript to study. It must be Medieval or Renaissance period, i.e., dated before 1500. I suggest that you visit a local library or institution that houses a collection of manuscripts. If you are unable to do this you may be able to conduct your research on the Web. A caution in using only the Web for your research is that collections may not go into enough depth on the website for you to find the detailed information you need and some don’t include photos. Going to a library that has a collection of manuscripts is the best way to complete the assignment. Even if you visit a manuscript collection or find a good website you will need to conduct some additional research above and beyond what you find in the library or on the Website. It is critical to select a manuscript that fits the assignment and that you can find information that enables you to provide information on all (or most) of the elements listed below. You need to be interested in it to do justice to a critical examination of the manuscript you choose.

Your study must address the following points. Please use the headings that the instructor has assigned. Examples: It is not enough to just jot down the author or creator. Tell me something about the author or creator - or at least something about the time in which he/she/they lived. It is not enough to just jot down the name of the script. Tell me a little bit about it. It is not enough to say yes there is a binding - tell me about the binding. This assignment is an academic/scholarly endeavor and your writing style and research should reflect that.

Checklist of mandatory Manuscript Study elements/features:

  • Introduction
  • Context (set the manuscript into its period and provide some background information)
  • Author(s) or creator. What could you find out about them?
  • Title(s)
  • Photo(s) of the manuscript if you can find any to include
  • Incipit
  • Explicit
  • Colophon
  • Size
  • Binding
  • Material written on (parchment or paper)
  • Collation and how was it put together: rulings, page, or leaf layout
  • Script(s) or type of writing
  • Hands of different scribes?
  • Ink
  • Rubrication
  • Decoration
  • Illumination/Painting
  • Summary
  • Reference Page(s)

Clarification
Remember each manuscript is unique and may not have all the features on the checklist; on the other hand, you will probably find things not mentioned on the checklist and so you should add to the list above anything else that is pertinent to understanding the manuscript’s significance.

Submission Formats
Students may either submit a traditional paper in Microsoft Word or you can build a blog/wiki as the format for the assignment. Blogs/Wikis must include all of the same element/features that you would include in a paper format.

Writing-Research Standards
Students will produce assignments that meet writing and research standards appropriate for students in a Master’s program of study. It is critical to proofread your work before turning it in. Graduate level writing standards do not tolerate spelling or grammatical errors of any kind. Students are encouraged to refer to a writing handbook - Strunk and White’s Elements of Style for example. APA is mandated for citations included within the text of the paper and reference/bib page(s). See class rubric under Lessons on the Blackboard Collaborate class site for description of criteria/expectations for each grade level.

Spelling and Grammar
I may not read your entire paper for spelling and grammar mistakes; if, in my opinion, your paper or database contains too many I will reduce your points substantially stop grading your paper for mechanics and will go on for content and other elements that are required in the assignment.

Plagiarism

The instructor has a zero tolerance policy in regards to plagiarism and will inform the University of any incidences of plagiarism for disciplinary action.

Core Competencies:  C,F,O              Learning Outcomes:  1, 2, 3, 4, 5

MANUSCRIPT ASSIGNMENT (7 points)
PART 2 - Presentation of Manuscript Study

Each student will present a 10-minute presentation during an Blackboard Collaborate session presenting an overview of research findings for the manuscript assignment. The presentation should not be a reading of you paper but be a PowerPoint that will introduce the class to the manuscript and show pictures and special features you feel are important for the class to know about.

Blackboard Collaborate Sessions:
1/2 Class - March 15
1/2 Class - March 22

Core Competencies:  C,F,O              Learning Outcomes:  1, 2, 3, 4, 5

PRINTED BOOK STUDY 

(20 points)
PART 1 – /Blog
DUE DATE April 25th Midnight PST to drop box

Choose a printed book to describe (see criteria below). You must select a book from the invention of printing until 1940. I suggest that you visit a local library or institution that houses a collection of antique books. If you are unable to do this you may be able to conduct your research on the Web. A caution in using only the Web for your research is collections may not go into enough depth on the website for you to find the detailed information you need and some don’t include photos.

Going to a library that has a collection of antique books is the best way to complete the assignment. Even if you visit an antique book collection or find a good website you will need to conduct some additional research above and beyond what you find in the library or on the Website. Be careful of the book you choose.

It is best to choose a book that is of interest to you and that meets the assignment criteria not one that you “think” we’ll be OK. Take a close look before you go to far into your research process. Your study should address the following points. Each point should have its own heading followed by the pertinent information. You should include as much information as you can find on each point. For example it is not enough to just jot down the printer. Tell me something about the printer. It is not enough to just indicate the author’s name. Tell me something about the author. It is not enough to say yes there is a binding! Tell about it.

You must include all of the following elements/features in your study:

  • Title(s)
  • Printer(s)
  • Publisher(s)
  • Place of publication
  • Author(s)
  • Title page (for early books: is there one, and with what developments?)
  • Introduction
  • Context (set the printed book into its period and provide some background information)
  • Incipit and explicit (for incunabula)
  • Colophon Size and format (folio, quarto, octavo, etc.)
  • Collation Paper (watermarks?)
  • Page layout
  • Foliation/pagination
  • Printer's Device- Type (i.e., roman, italic, gothic, etc.)
  • Color printing
  • Rubrication
  • Decoration (MS or printed)
  • Illumination/Painting
  • Binding
  • Endleaves and flyleaves
  • Conclusion/Summary
  • Reference Page(s)

Topic must have its own heading followed by the pertinent information.

You should include as much information as you can find on each point. If element is not appropriate to your book then put the topic header and say either Not Applicable or tell why there is nothing to write about.

EXAMPLES
See the class Blackboard Collaborate site for examples under Lessons

Clarification
Remember each book is unique and may not have all the features on the checklist; on the other hand, you will probably find things not mentioned on the checklist and so you should add to the list above anything else that is pertinent to understanding the book’s significance.

Submission Formats
Students may either submit a traditional paper in Microsoft Word or you can build a blog as the format for the assignment. Blogs must include all of the same element/features that you would include in a paper format.

Writing-Research Standards
Students will produce assignments that meet writing and research standards appropriate for students in a Master’s program of study. It is critical to proofread your work before turning it in. Graduate level writing standards do not tolerate spelling or grammatical errors of any kind. Students are encouraged to refer to a writing handbook - Strunk and White’s Elements of Style for example. APA is mandated for citations included within the text of the paper and reference/bib page(s).

Spelling and Grammar
I may not read your entire paper for spelling and grammar mistakes; if, in my opinion, your paper or database contains too many I will reduce your points substantially stop grading your paper for mechanics and will go on for content and other elements that are required in the assignment.

Paper Format

  • Minimum of 15 pages double-spaced. Title page and reference page(s) are in addition to the 15 pages.
  • Cover/Title page (name, course name and section number, school name, date, instructor’s name. Title should be what the Instructor has named the assignment. The title you have created for the assignment may be used as a secondary title.
  • Page Numbers (except on the Title Page).
  • Name of assignment on each page (other than the cover page) and use the Instructor’s name for the assignment not any you have created.
  • Reference Page/Works Cited in full accordance with APA formatting
  • Citations/Quotes in the body of the paper need to be formatted according to APA rules.
  • Spelling, grammar, and syntactical errors will not be tolerated.

Plagiarism
The instructor has a zero tolerance policy in regards to plagiarism and will inform the University of any incidences of plagiarism for disciplinary action.

Core Competencies:  C,F,O              Learning Outcomes:  2, 3, 4, 5

BOOK STUDY (7 points)
PART 2 - Presentation of Book Study

Each student will present a 10-minute presentation during an Blackboard Collaborate session presenting an overview of research findings for the book study assignment. The presentation should not be a reading of you paper but a power point that introduces the class to the book and shows pictures and special features you feel are important for the class to know about.

Blackboard Collaborate Sessions:
1/2 Class – April 26
1/2 Class – May 3

Core Competencies:  C,F,O              Learning Outcomes:  2, 3, 4, 5

LIBRARY RESEARCH PROJECT (30 points)
DUE DATE May 14th Midnight PST
Send instructor the URL by posting to the provided discussion thread or send direct to instructor’s email address.

FORMAT: Blog/Wiki
The Blog will be evaluate in the same way that a research paper would be and it will be held to the same standards of writing and required elements/features.

LIBRARY HISTORY
In this assignment, you will research and write a social history of a US public/academic/special library of your choosing. The instructor must approve your choices. Email the instructor your choice by no later than February 5th – the instructor will only allow two people in each section to research the same library so have a second and third choices. You may have to look at the entire state not just where you work for one to choose. Think creatively and research a library that will challenge you and be new to you. Choose a library of that: 
1) was established prior to 1920 2) has some institutional records (i.e., legal, financial, or personnel documents; correspondence; memorabilia and ephemera; trustee minutes; annual reports; reminiscences and oral histories; clippings; etc.). Using these records and any local and institutional histories available construct a history of the library from its inception through 1920.

Your library history should concentrate on one or more of the following areas of inquiry: the origins of the public library movement in the town; the staffing and operation of a pioneer library; and the building and facilities of early libraries in the United States. 

Start your research process early. It will be necessary to look deeper into the literature surrounding the period that the book was published and these resources may be outside of the sources provided by the instructor or the class readings.

As you do your research, look for answers to the following questions:

1. General

  • What were the libraries’ origins and how was the library founded?
  • When was the library first opened?
  • Was it a reading room or social library prior to becoming a public institution?
  • Which individuals or organizations were behind it’s founding and what purpose(s) did they think the library would have?
  • Who were the founders of the library (class, race, ethnicity, gender, religious background, etc.)?
  • Who used the library?
  • Do you get a sense of whom the founders targeted and who the early patrons were?
  • Was this a white, middle-class oriented institution, or did the early library reflect a diverse population?

2. Staff and Operation

  • Who was the first librarian, and what can you find out about his/her background, personal life, and professional training?
  • What was the librarian's salary, and was there much turnover in the position?
  • Who were the library assistants, what were they paid, what was their training or preparation, and what did they do on the job?
  • What individuals were on the first board of trustees and what role did they play in the library's operation?
  • What services did the library provide (children's room, reference, classes, delivery stations, lecture series, Americanization or community outreach programs, etc.), and did these services change over time?
  • More particularly, what does your library's history reveal about the development of libraries and the library profession in America between 1850 and 1920?

3. Building and Facilities

  • Where was the first library located, and how was the land and building obtained?
  • Did the library receive a Carnegie grant?
  • What impact did the grant have on library operations?
  • What did the library look like, and how was it laid out?
  • What does the library's design say about the roles and images that the library had?
  • What does the design and layout of the early library suggest about the working conditions experienced by pioneer librarians?

Grading of this assignment will be based on the following criteria, as well as the criteria on the rubric and any other clarifications on spelling, grammar and writing mechanics indicated in this Greensheet/Syllabus:

  • Conceptualization and presentation. Does the paper have a governing theme or set of questions that give focus to the narrative? Is the paper arranged in a logical order, and is there an identifiable introduction and conclusion? Is the writing style intelligible and effective? Have you used the style manual effectively for notes and bibliography?
  • Quality and quantity of research. Have you done ample reading in the secondary literature pertaining to the history of the town and library or is your history based largely on a single source? Have you located and used primary sources? Is your research evident in the written presentation through the use of quotes and footnotes?
  • Depth and quality of analysis. Have you identified significant themes and issues that emerged during your research into the library's history? Do you describe and analyze these themes or simply present an unanalyzed chronology of changes and events? To what extent have you related the particulars of your library to the broader themes in library history presented in the class lectures and readings? Have you included all of the required elements in your assignment?

Blog/Wiki Format

  • The finished blog/wiki must be the equivalent of a 25 – 30 page paper in content.
  • Cover/Title page content should be included either in a banner or at the top of the blog's homepage (name, course name and section number, school name, date, instructor’s name.) Title should be what the Instructor has named the assignment.
  • The title you have created for the assignment may be used as a secondary title. Include this information in the banner at the top.
  • Reference Page/Works Cited in full accordance with APA formatting
  • Citations/Quotes in the body of the blog/wiki need to be formatted according to APA.
  • Spelling, grammar, and syntactical errors will not be tolerated.
  • List different elements or topics on the homepage of the blog/wiki (much likes a Table of Contents) so that I/readers can search for the introduction or other elements of the assignment without scrolling the whole blog.
  • Avoid making separate blog/wiki pages for each element – makes the blog/wiki tedious to read and grade.

Writing-Research Standards
Students will produce assignments that meet writing and research standards appropriate for students in a Master’s program of study. It is critical to proofread your work before turning it in. Graduate level writing standards do not tolerate spelling or grammatical errors of any kind. Students are encouraged to refer to a writing handbook - Strunk and White’s Elements of Style for example. APA is mandated for citations included within the text of the paper and reference/bib page(s).

Spelling and Grammar
I may not read your entire paper for spelling and grammar mistakes; if, in my opinion, your paper or database contains too many I will reduce your points substantially stop grading your paper for mechanics and will go on for content and other elements that are required in the assignment.

Plagiarism
The instructor has a zero tolerance policy in regards to plagiarism and will inform the University of any incidences of plagiarism for disciplinary action.

Core Competencies:  C,F,O              Learning Outcomes:  6,7,8

Textbooks and Readings

Reading Assignments
Instructor may assign additional readings but will inform students well in advance of what they are and where they can be found.

Required Textbooks:

  • Avrin, L. (2010). Scribes, Script and Books (Reprint of 1991 ed.). Chicago, IL: American Library Association. Available through Amazon: 0838910386. arrow gif indicating link outside sjsu domain
  • Brown, M. P. (1994). Understanding Illuminated Manuscripts. Los Angeles: Getty Publications. Available through Amazon: 0892362170. arrow gif indicating link outside sjsu domain
  • Finkelstein, D., & McCleery, A. (2006). The Book History Reader (2nd ed.). New York: Routledge. Available through Amazon: 0415359481. arrow gif indicating link outside sjsu domain

Grading Scale

The standard SJSU School of Information Grading Scale is utilized for all iSchool courses:

97 to 100 A
94 to 96 A minus
91 to 93 B plus
88 to 90 B
85 to 87 B minus
82 to 84 C plus
79 to 81 C
76 to 78 C minus
73 to 75 D plus
70 to 72 D
67 to 69 D minus
Below 67 F

 

In order to provide consistent guidelines for assessment for graduate level work in the School, these terms are applied to letter grades:

  • C represents Adequate work; a grade of "C" counts for credit for the course;
  • B represents Good work; a grade of "B" clearly meets the standards for graduate level work;
    For core courses in the MLIS program (not MARA) — INFO 200, INFO 202, INFO 204 — the iSchool requires that students earn a B in the course. If the grade is less than B (B- or lower) after the first attempt you will be placed on administrative probation.  You must repeat the class the following semester. If -on the second attempt- you do not pass the class with a grade of B or better (not B- but B) you will be disqualified.
  • A represents Exceptional work; a grade of "A" will be assigned for outstanding work only.

Students are advised that it is their responsibility to maintain a 3.0 Grade Point Average (GPA).

University Policies

General Expectations, Rights and Responsibilities of the Student

As members of the academic community, students accept both the rights and responsibilities incumbent upon all members of the institution. Students are encouraged to familiarize themselves with SJSU's policies and practices pertaining to the procedures to follow if and when questions or concerns about a class arises. See University Policy S90-5 at http://www.sjsu.edu/senate/docs/S90-5.pdf. More detailed information on a variety of related topics is available in the SJSU catalog at http://info.sjsu.edu/web-dbgen/catalog/departments/LIS.html. In general, it is recommended that students begin by seeking clarification or discussing concerns with their instructor. If such conversation is not possible, or if it does not serve to address the issue, it is recommended that the student contact the Department Chair as a next step.

Dropping and Adding

Students are responsible for understanding the policies and procedures about add/drop, grade forgiveness, etc. Refer to the current semester's Catalog Policies section at http://info.sjsu.edu/static/catalog/policies.html. Add/drop deadlines can be found on the current academic year calendars document on the Academic Calendars webpage at http://www.sjsu.edu/provost/services/academic_calendars/. The Late Drop Policy is available at http://www.sjsu.edu/aars/policies/latedrops/policy/. Students should be aware of the current deadlines and penalties for dropping classes.

Information about the latest changes and news is available at the Advising Hub at http://www.sjsu.edu/advising/.

Consent for Recording of Class and Public Sharing of Instructor Material

University Policy S12-7, http://www.sjsu.edu/senate/docs/S12-7.pdf, requires students to obtain instructor's permission to record the course and the following items to be included in the syllabus:

  • "Common courtesy and professional behavior dictate that you notify someone when you are recording him/her. You must obtain the instructor's permission to make audio or video recordings in this class. Such permission allows the recordings to be used for your private, study purposes only. The recordings are the intellectual property of the instructor; you have not been given any rights to reproduce or distribute the material."
    • It is suggested that the syllabus include the instructor's process for granting permission, whether in writing or orally and whether for the whole semester or on a class by class basis.
    • In classes where active participation of students or guests may be on the recording, permission of those students or guests should be obtained as well.
  • "Course material developed by the instructor is the intellectual property of the instructor and cannot be shared publicly without his/her approval. You may not publicly share or upload instructor generated material for this course such as exam questions, lecture notes, or homework solutions without instructor consent."

Academic integrity

Your commitment, as a student, to learning is evidenced by your enrollment at San Jose State University. The University Academic Integrity Policy F15-7 at http://www.sjsu.edu/senate/docs/F15-7.pdf requires you to be honest in all your academic course work. Faculty members are required to report all infractions to the office of Student Conduct and Ethical Development. The Student Conduct and Ethical Development website is available at http://www.sjsu.edu/studentconduct/.

Campus Policy in Compliance with the American Disabilities Act

If you need course adaptations or accommodations because of a disability, or if you need to make special arrangements in case the building must be evacuated, please make an appointment with me as soon as possible, or see me during office hours. Presidential Directive 97-03 at http://www.sjsu.edu/president/docs/directives/PD_1997-03.pdf requires that students with disabilities requesting accommodations must register with the Accessible Education Center (AEC) at http://www.sjsu.edu/aec to establish a record of their disability.

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