LIBR 265-01
LIBR 265-10
Materials for Young Adults
Summer 2009 Greensheet

Beth Wrenn-Estes
E-mail
Phone (Cell): (303)349-8488 (emergencies only)
Office Hours: By Appointment


Greensheet Links Textbooks and Readings
Course Requirements
Elluminate Sessions
Grading
Weekly Outline
Assignments
Course Links
Blog
Resources
ANGEL
ANGEL Tutorials
iSchool eBookstore

Disclaimer: The instructor reserves the right to update the class blog and Angel site with additional materials throughout the semester.

THE ANGEL SITE/GREENSHEET
Check out the Angel class site often for new materials, announcements, and other relevant information for the class throughout the semester. You are responsible to know the content on the Angel site and all of the expectations and assignments explained in the Greensheet.

Course Description

This course will allow students to take an in depth look at materials in a variety of formats for teens ages 15-18, including fiction, popular nonfiction, graphic novels, movies, computer games, websites, other media, and determine how they can meet developmental needs.

Course Objectives

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the external (societal) and internal (developmental) forces which influence teens’ choices of recreational and informational sources and materials
  2. Evaluate selection tools, and use appropriate resources to develop a collection of materials for older teens, including all appropriate formats, print, nonprint, computer software, music, etc.
  3. Critically examine representative materials designed for older teens, including print and non-print formats, books, graphic novels, television, movies, music, and a wide variety of computer software, including social networking software, and apply criteria to evaluate them in relation to developmental needs, multi-cultural concerns, and meeting the informational and recreational needs of this age group
  4. Create an appropriate materials collection for older teens, including print and non-print materials and a variety of the digital resources currently available for this age group
  5. Exhibit knowledge of published resources about print and non-print materials for older teens, such as reference materials, selection tools, and Web sites
  6. Assist parents and caregivers with questions about appropriate materials for their older teen children

This course supports the following SLIS Core Competencies:

  • articulate the ethics, values and foundational principles of library and information professionals and their role in the promotion of intellectual freedom (1)
  • demonstrate oral and written communication skills necessary for group work, collaborations and professional level presentations (2)
  • use the basic concepts and principles related to the creation, evaluation, selection, acquisition, preservation and organization of specific items or collections of information (3)
  • use service concepts, principles and techniques that facilitate information access, relevance, and accuracy for individuals or groups of users (4)
  • apply the fundamental principles of planning, management and marketing/advocacy (5)

Course Requirements

Questions, Comments, Concerns
Please post all questions, concerns, and general comments on the thread provided under Lessons on the class Angel site. If your question or concern is considered by you to be of a personal nature, send directly to the instructor’s email.

Elluminate Sessions - MANDATORY

  • Wednesday, June 24 – Sections LIBR 265 01, 10
    Discussion of “Little Brother” by Cory Doctorow
    7-9 p.m. Pacific - Session is Mandatory

    Note: Instructor will assign pairings and questions. Students will present their answers during elluminate session.
     
  • Wednesday, July 22 – Sections LIBR 265 01, 10
    Discussion of “Luna” by Julie Ann Peters
    7-9 p.m. Pacific - Session is Mandatory 

    Note: Instructor will assign pairings and questions. Students will present their answers during elluminate session.

Competencies: 1,2
Objectives: C

Grading
Grading scale is at end of greensheet/final grades are not rounded up

Everyone begins the class with a grade of "B", the standard grade for graduate level work. Students who complete the assignments and participate in all discussions will receive the B provided the quality of written work meets the standard of rigorous scholarly work for the University. Above standard work is defined clearly. The breakdown for your course grade, based on the SJSU SLIS Grading Scale, is as meeting the following criteria:

  • Originality in the approach to the assignment.
  • Greater depth of analysis than the written assignment expects
  • Critical evaluation readings by comparing them to other authors or sources.
  • Ability to organize information for themselves and others plus create tools for life-long learning and knowledge retrieval.

Writing-Research Standards
Students will produce assignments that meet writing and research standards appropriate for students in a Master’s program of study (see grading above). It is critical to proofread your work before turning it in.. Students refer to a style manual to aid with your writing assignments (Strunk and White, APA Style Manual are examples of such manuals).

Plagarism
The instructor has a zero tolerance policy in regards to plagiarism. The University is informed immediately of any incidences of plagiarism.

Assignment Parts/Composition/Mechanical Issues

  • Genre Study/Digital Resources Papers (pertains to journal as well)
    • Cover/Title page
    • Number Pages (except Title Page)
    • Name of assignment on each page (other than the cover page)
    • Reference Page/Works Cited in full accordance with APA formatting
    • CitationsQuotes in the body of the paper need to be in full accordance with APA formatting
    • Work must be double spaced and typed - no handwritten scans
    • Spelling, grammar, and syntactical errors will result in a loss of points on the assignment
  • Research Project/Blog must include:
    • All criteria stated in assignment description above as well as;
    • An index showing all titles included in the project for easy searching by the evaluator.
    • Spelling, grammar, and syntactical errors will result in loss of points on the assignment

Grading Rubric/Individual Assignment Evaluation Forms
The rubric for written assignments and the instructor individual assignment student evaluation forms are located on the Lessons page on the Angel course site.

E-mail Subject Lines/Naming of Assignment Files

  1. Format for subject line for all email correspondence: LIBR 265_01_10_YOUR LAST NAME
  2. Format the file name for all of your assignments: LIBR 265_01_10_YOUR LAST NAME_KEYWORD OF ASSIGNMENT TITLE

E-mail Response Time
Instructor answers email on a regular basis throughout the day and evenings. The general policy is email responses are within 24-hours of receipt. The instructor, from time-to-time, may have to increase the time between receipt and answer of emails but will inform the class when this may become necessary.

Crisis or Emergency
Please call the instructor if a situation will prevent you from doing assignments, elluminate sessions and discussion threads. You will receive a zero for any course work missed unless you have received permission from the instructor and other arrangements have been made. The instructor reserves the right to deduct points (the number of which is determined by the instructor) for any work not done on time, missed elluminate sessions or non-participation in discussion threads. Instructor’s cell phone number is 303-349-8488 (pacific time zone).

Course Calendar
Subject to change with fair notice.

Technology Requirements
You will need a high-speed connection (DSL, cable, etc.) to successfully take this class. Please see the Technology Requirements and Instructions for Success handout.

SOTES
Students evaluate the course and instructor at the end of each term. An announcement will go out from the administration letting students/faculty know when they are available to complete. Those completing the SOTES, and informing me of doing so, will receive 1 point. The importance of SOTES is very easy to describe – it is the student voice to the administration and the instructor and it is so very important to improving courses and instruction.

Summary - Assignment Point Values


Digital Resources 20
Database Project 30
Genre Study 20
Discussion Threads (3 pts. each – 5 total) 15
Elluminate Book Discussion – Little Brother 7
Elluminate Book Discussion – Luna 7
SOTES Completion 1
Total Points 100

NOTE: The instructor reserves the right to deduct points (the number of which is determined by the instructor) for any work not done on time, missed elluminate sessions or non-participation in discussion threads.

Lectures - Encouraged
The instructor records and posts to the Class Blog and uTube lectures on different topics relevant to YA Materials for ages 15-18.
BLOG (Maintained by the Instructor from iWeb)

Discussion Threads - Mandatory
There are five in total each worth three points. Two posts per thread are required. The first post must be a substantial one that includes your insights and opinions with citations to any references you are quoting in your post.  The substantial post must be on the thread by midnight Thursday of the week assigned. The second post must be a response to one of you classmates and this post must be on the thread by the 5pm on Sunday of the week assigned.
Competencies: 1,2/Objectives: A, C

Weekly Outlines
Schedule/Assignments/Readings

  • WEEK 1 – June 1 to June 7
    Discussion Thread
    Introduce yourself to the class. Tell about your background, occupation, where you are in the program and any other family or personal information you would like to share. (0 points)

    Readings
    • What is Young Adult Literature, Garland (Under Lessons on class site/ Week 1)
    • Goodstein, Introduction and Chapter 1
    • Primal Teen, Strauch – Chapter 2 (Under Lessons on glass site/ Week 1)
    • Read Articles on the Brain (Under Lesson on class site/Week 1)
    • Visit the YALSA site – explore - http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/yalsa/yalsa.cfm
    Lecture – Assignment and Expectations (on instructor’s blog/uTube)

    Weekly Topics: Cognitive, Emotional and Social Development, Teenage Brain Development, Totally Wired Teens
     
  • WEEK 2 – June 8 to June 14
    Discussion Thread - None

    Readings
    • Primal Teen, Strauch - Chapter 3 (Under Lessons on class site/ Week 2)
    • All Brain Articles (Under Lessons on class site/ Week 2)
    • Anderson, Chapters 2, 3
    • Goodstein, Chapters 2, 3, 4,5
    • Herald, Chapter 1
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3gvcpb4_7ZQ (When I grow up by the Pussy Cat Dolls)
       
    Weekly Topics: Non-Fiction, Programming Ideas for Older Teens, Designing Teen Spaces, Digital Resources, Internet Bullying and Parental Controls
     
  • WEEK 3 – June 15 to June 21
    Discussion Thread
    Discuss brain articles and read in Strauch during Week 1 and 2 – 3 points (2 posts per student)

    Readings
    • Anderson, Chapter 4
    • Herald, Chapter 2
    • Goodstein, Chapters 6,7
       
    Weekly Topics: Reading Interests of Teens, Teachers in the online world, Teen Activism and Media Creation
     
  • WEEK 4 – June 22 to June 28
    Discussion Thread
    Discuss Internet Bullying and the importance of social networking for teens this age. 3 points (2 posts per student)

    Readings
    Lecture – Reader’s Advisory (on instructor’s blog/uTube)

    Elluminate Session
    WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24 – SECTIONS LIBR 265 01, 10
    Discussion of “Little Brother” by Cory Doctorow
    7-9 p.m. Pacific - Session is Mandatory

    Weekly Topics: Realistic Fiction, Booktalking
     
  • WEEK 5 – June 29 to July 5
    Discussion Thread – None

    Readings
    • Anderson, Chapter 6
    • Herald, Chapters 3,4
    • All booktalking articles under lessons on the class Angel site
       
    Assignment Due – June 29th – by midnight to assignment dropbox
    Digital Resources Observation/Opinion Paper

    Weekly Topics: Booktalking, Genre
     
  • WEEK 6 – July 6 to July 12
    Discussion Thread
    Discuss other materials (non-print) – value of gaming, movies, music to teens of this age and what youth services librarians need to think about when providing collection, programming and services to this age group.

    Readings
    • Anderson, Chapter 7
    • Herald, Chapters 5,6,7
    • Aronson, Disturbing the Universe, Chapters 3, 4 (Under Lessons on class site/ Week 6)
       
    Lecture - Genres

    Weekly Topics: Non-Print Collections, Genre, Value of YA/Trouble with Reviews
  • WEEK 7 – July 13 to July 19
    Discussion Thread
    Discuss the value of controversial literature for young adults

    Readings Lecture – Selection Tools, Collection Development, Writing Reviews (on instructor’s blog/uTube)

    Weekly Topics: Genre, Sex and Power in YA Literature
     
  • WEEK 8 - July 20 – July 26
    Discussion Thread - none

    Readings
    • Herald, Chapter 11, 12
    • From Romance to Realism, Cart, Chapter 7 (Under Lessons on glass site/ Week 8)
    • Additional reading from Instructor
       
    Elluminate Session
    WEDNESDAY, JULY 22 – SECTIONS LIBR 265 01, 10
    Discussion of “Luna” by Julie Ann Peters
    7-9 p.m. Pacific - Session is Mandatory

    Assignment Due – July 23rd – 11:59 p.m. to class dropbox provided for the assignment - Genre Study Paper

    Weekly Topics: Genre
     
  • WEEK 9 – July 27 to August 2
    Work on your research project

    Discussion Thread – None

    Readings
    – None

    Weekly Topics: Research Young Adult Materials Project
     
  • WEEK 10 – August 3 to August 7
    Discussion ThreadTHREAD ENDS ON FRIDAY, AUGUST 7th – 11:59 p.m.
    ALL POSTS (2) ARE TO BE MADE BY AUGUST 7th)
    Reflections on summer semester – thoughts, insights on your learning experience in this class. 3 points (2 posts per student)

    Readings - none

    Assignment Due – August 7 – by midnight (send blog URL to instructor via email) - Young Adult Research Project

In Depth Assignment Descriptions

  • DIGITAL RESOURCES
    DUE JUNE 29, 2009 (by midnight)
    20 points


    Description
    Spend a minimum of three hours examining resources, observing teens using resources, and researching digital resources beyond the readings for the class. Spend twenty -thirty minutes of the observation spent interacting with teens and inquiring about their thoughts on what digital technologies they use. Introduce yourself to the librarian on duty and relate to them the assignment you are doing and where you go to school then ask permission from the librarian to interact with teens before you approach them. If they deny you access then state that in your paper or try a different location before giving up on this element of the assignment.

    Journal
    You must keep a journal documenting each observation, include where you did the observation, length of time, and thoughts you have about the observation. Do the observation in multiple sessions so you can see as many teens working with technology as you can. (See example of journal under Course Documents) You may use a school or public library environment including where you work as an observation environment. You will then make the journal into a more formal writing style to include in your paper.

    Bring together all the information and write a critical analysis of youth and technology in today’s library environment. Include references to your reading and research. Include the name of each resource you observed and a brief description of it in the body of your paper.

    Please include your journal as an appendix to the paper.

    ASSIGNMENT FORMATTING COMPOSITION/MECHANICAL ISSUES
    Papers must include:
    • Cover/Title page
    • Page numbering
    • Name of assignment on each page (other than the cover page)
    • Reference Page/Works Cited in full accordance with APA formatting
    • Citations in the body of the paper need to be in full accordance with APA format
    • Work must be double spaced and typed
    • Spelling, grammar, and syntactical errors will result in loss of points on the assignment
    WRITING-RESEARCH STANDARDS
    Students must produce assignments that meet writing and research standards appropriate for students in a Master’s program of study. It is important to proofread your work before turning it in. Any grammatical errors or poor writing will cause a loss of points on the assignment. Use active voice not passive in your compositions whenever possible. Students may want to refer to a style manual to aid with writing for assignments (Strunk and White, APA Style Manual as examples).

    EXAMPLES OF ASSIGNMENT: There is no paper provided for an example of the assignment. If one becomes available it will be announced and placed on the Lessons page on the class Angel site.

    Competencies: 2,4/Objectives: A
     
  • GENRE/SUB GENRE STUDY
    THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009 (by midnight)
    WORTH 15 POINTS
    • Students choose the genre or sub-genre they want to research
    • Students must read 15 books from the chosen genre or sub-genre
    • Genre study titles may be included in the Young Adult Materials Research Project
    Description
    Describe in detail the genre and discuss the characteristics and common elements that exist within the genre. Describe it's relevancy to the materials written for teens in the age group we are studying. Students should use Herald for Teen Genres/Sub-Genres as a starting point to research for the paper, but the instructor expects students to go beyond Herald’s comments and find other relevant sources for the genre/sub-genre research. Evaluation of the titles must be scholarly and critical in nature.

    Student’s papers must include the following elements (at a minimum, you may add any additional ones you want)
    • Introduction/Summary
    • Information on main teen authors in the genre
    • Bibliographic information (at a minimum Title, Author, ISBN, Publisher, Copyright Date)
    • Plot Summary (in your own words)
    • Critical Evaluation (in your own words)
    • Reader’s Annotation (in your own words)
    • Booktalking Ideas
    • Reading Level/Interest Age
    • Why did you include this book in your chosen titles? Awards, Reviews, etc.
    • Controversial subject matters and defense ideas for challenges
       
    EXAMPLE OF ASSIGNMENT: On the Lessons page on the class Angel site.

    WARNING - this is to be used as an example - it is provided as a courtesy to you and is from a previous class where some of the requirements may differ from the current assignment for Summer, 2009.

    ASSIGNMENT FORMATTING COMPOSITION/MECHANICAL ISSUES
    Papers must include:
    • Cover/Title page
    • Page numbering
    • Name of assignment on each page (other than the cover page)
    • Reference Page/Works Cited in full accordance with APA formatting
    • Citations in the body of the paper need to be in full accordance with APA format
    • Work must be double spaced and typed
    • Spelling, grammar, and syntactical errors will result in loss of points on the assignment
       
    WRITING-RESEARCH STANDARDS
    Students must produce assignments that meet writing and research standards appropriate for students in a Master’s program of study. It is important to proofread your work before turning it in. Any grammatical errors or poor writing will cause a loss of points on the assignment. Use active voice not passive in your compositions whenever possible. Students may want to refer to a style manual to aid with writing for assignments (Strunk and White, APA Style Manual as examples).

    Competencies: 1, 2/ Objectives: B,C,D
     
  • YOUNG ADULT MATERIALS RESEARCH PROJECT
    DUE AUGUST 7, 2009 (by midnight)
    WORTH 30 POINTS

    Description
    You MUST create a blog for the assignments contents. Please see the criteria included in the list below and follow the directions related to it's inclusion in your project. This research project must include all types of materials; if you include the titles from your genre paper, you cannot add any more titles from that genre to the titles you chose for the remainder of the required titles for the project.

    COMPOSITION: 35 titles are required for your project (the instructor assumes that you have read/watched each of them). The project must include titles written or focused especially for Teens. The titles must be appropriate for teens aged 15-18. You may include 5 Adult Cross-Over Titles and up to 10 non-print items (DVD, Games, Music CD's)

    MUST INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:
    Use the names of the individual parts of the assignment as the headers throughout your blog. *Each one must be a separate entry and not combined
    • Bibliographic information (at a minimum Title, Author, ISBN (or other identifying numbers as will be present on DVD's, Publisher, Copyright Date)
    • Plot Summary (composed in your own words)*
    • Critical Evaluation (composed in your own words)*
    • Reader’s Annotation (composed in your own words)*
    • Information about the author”
    • Genre
    • Curriculum Ties
    • Booktalking Ideas (composed in your own words)*
    • Reading Level/Interest Age
    • Challenge Issues, if any and brief idea of how the work would be defended
    • Why did you include this book in your chosen titles? (composed in your own words)* and any selection tools that helped in your selection or support of your selection
    • An index showing all titles included in the project for easy searching by the instructor as well as any other indexing
       
    NOTE: Students MAY include titles read for genre study paper and the 2-required titles for Elluminate discussion sessions.

    PROJECT EXAMPLE:
    There is an example of a previous student’s blog on the class Angel site. You may not copy or reproduce this blog in any way. This is provided as an EXAMPLE and the assignment is from a previous semester. The requirements may have changed so please use the requirements for Summer, 2009 assignment.

    WRITING-RESEARCH STANDARDS
    Students will produce assignments that meet writing and research standards appropriate for students in a Master’s program of study. It is important to proofread your work before turning it in. Any grammatical errors or poor writing will cause a loss of points on the assignment. Use active voice not passive in your compositions whenever possible. Students may want to refer to a style manual to aid with writing for assignments (Strunk and White, APA Style Manual as examples).

    Competencies: 1,2/Objectives: A,B,C,D,E

Textbooks and Readings 

Required Textbook:

  • Anderson, S. (2004). Serving Older Teens. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited. Available through Amazon: 0313317623. arrow gif indicating link outside sjsu domain
  • Doctorow, C. (2008). Little Brother. New York City, NY: Tom Doherty Associates, LLC. Available through Amazon: 0765319853. arrow gif indicating link outside sjsu domain
  • Goodstein, A. (2007). totally wired: What teens and tweens are really doing online. New. York: St. Martin's Press. Available through Amazon: 0312360126. arrow gif indicating link outside sjsu domain
  • Herald, D. T. (2003). Teen genreflecting: a guide to reading interests (2nd ed.). Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited. Available through Amazon: 1563089963. arrow gif indicating link outside sjsu domain
  • Peters, J. A. (2004). Luna. New York, NY: Little Brown. Available through Amazon: 0316011274. arrow gif indicating link outside sjsu domain

Recommended Textbook:

  • Loertscher, D. V., Harland, M. A., & McElmeel, S. (2008). Young Adult Literature and Multimedia 4th edition. Salt Lake City, UT: Salt Lake City, UT: Hi Willow Research and publishing. Available through Amazon: 1933170107. arrow gif indicating link outside sjsu domain


Grading Scale

The standard SJSU School of Information Grading Scale is utilized for all iSchool courses:

97 to 100 A
94 to 96 A minus
91 to 93 B plus
88 to 90 B
85 to 87 B minus
82 to 84 C plus
79 to 81 C
76 to 78 C minus
73 to 75 D plus
70 to 72 D
67 to 69 D minus
Below 67 F

 

In order to provide consistent guidelines for assessment for graduate level work in the School, these terms are applied to letter grades:

  • C represents Adequate work; a grade of "C" counts for credit for the course;
  • B represents Good work; a grade of "B" clearly meets the standards for graduate level work;
    For core courses in the MLIS program (not MARA) — INFO 200, INFO 202, INFO 204 — the iSchool requires that students earn a B in the course. If the grade is less than B (B- or lower) after the first attempt you will be placed on administrative probation.  You must repeat the class the following semester. If -on the second attempt- you do not pass the class with a grade of B or better (not B- but B) you will be disqualified.
  • A represents Exceptional work; a grade of "A" will be assigned for outstanding work only.

Students are advised that it is their responsibility to maintain a 3.0 Grade Point Average (GPA).

University Policies

General Expectations, Rights and Responsibilities of the Student

As members of the academic community, students accept both the rights and responsibilities incumbent upon all members of the institution. Students are encouraged to familiarize themselves with SJSU's policies and practices pertaining to the procedures to follow if and when questions or concerns about a class arises. See University Policy S90-5 at http://www.sjsu.edu/senate/docs/S90-5.pdf. More detailed information on a variety of related topics is available in the SJSU catalog at http://info.sjsu.edu/web-dbgen/catalog/departments/LIS.html. In general, it is recommended that students begin by seeking clarification or discussing concerns with their instructor. If such conversation is not possible, or if it does not serve to address the issue, it is recommended that the student contact the Department Chair as a next step.

Dropping and Adding

Students are responsible for understanding the policies and procedures about add/drop, grade forgiveness, etc. Refer to the current semester's Catalog Policies section at http://info.sjsu.edu/static/catalog/policies.html. Add/drop deadlines can be found on the current academic year calendars document on the Academic Calendars webpage at http://www.sjsu.edu/provost/services/academic_calendars/. The Late Drop Policy is available at http://www.sjsu.edu/aars/policies/latedrops/policy/. Students should be aware of the current deadlines and penalties for dropping classes.

Information about the latest changes and news is available at the Advising Hub at http://www.sjsu.edu/advising/.

Consent for Recording of Class and Public Sharing of Instructor Material

University Policy S12-7, http://www.sjsu.edu/senate/docs/S12-7.pdf, requires students to obtain instructor's permission to record the course and the following items to be included in the syllabus:

  • "Common courtesy and professional behavior dictate that you notify someone when you are recording him/her. You must obtain the instructor's permission to make audio or video recordings in this class. Such permission allows the recordings to be used for your private, study purposes only. The recordings are the intellectual property of the instructor; you have not been given any rights to reproduce or distribute the material."
    • It is suggested that the syllabus include the instructor's process for granting permission, whether in writing or orally and whether for the whole semester or on a class by class basis.
    • In classes where active participation of students or guests may be on the recording, permission of those students or guests should be obtained as well.
  • "Course material developed by the instructor is the intellectual property of the instructor and cannot be shared publicly without his/her approval. You may not publicly share or upload instructor generated material for this course such as exam questions, lecture notes, or homework solutions without instructor consent."

Academic integrity

Your commitment, as a student, to learning is evidenced by your enrollment at San Jose State University. The University Academic Integrity Policy F15-7 at http://www.sjsu.edu/senate/docs/F15-7.pdf requires you to be honest in all your academic course work. Faculty members are required to report all infractions to the office of Student Conduct and Ethical Development. The Student Conduct and Ethical Development website is available at http://www.sjsu.edu/studentconduct/.

Campus Policy in Compliance with the American Disabilities Act

If you need course adaptations or accommodations because of a disability, or if you need to make special arrangements in case the building must be evacuated, please make an appointment with me as soon as possible, or see me during office hours. Presidential Directive 97-03 at http://www.sjsu.edu/president/docs/directives/PD_1997-03.pdf requires that students with disabilities requesting accommodations must register with the Accessible Education Center (AEC) at http://www.sjsu.edu/aec to establish a record of their disability.

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